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 Post subject: Home made bead braker
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 10:26 pm 
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Those of you who have met me will know I am not the largest of people, so I struggle trying to change a tyre on a rim because I don't weigh enough to just be able to stand on the tyre and pop the bead:

So,

I have come up with a tool using the items I had to hand. The legs from a redundant Computer desk, a couple of lengths of studding with nuts and washer either end. An off cut of 4 x 2 steel tube. Assembled as per the picture and all you have to do is wind the one nut down the thread!

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:08 am 
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Bummer I was expecting to see a home made Bread Baker :o - that is how my old brain initially read your thread topic :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 1:00 am 
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Ingenious!

A Highlift jack bottom shoe pressing down on the tire, and the 'hook' being jacked up under something heavier than a Haflinger(!) will also do the job.

Bob

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:47 am 
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heinkeljb wrote:
Those of you who have met me will know I am not the largest of people, so I struggle trying to change a tyre on a rim because I don't weigh enough to just be able to stand on the tyre and pop the bead:

So,

I have come up with a tool using the items I had to hand. The legs from a redundant Computer desk, a couple of lengths of studding with nuts and washer either end. An off cut of 4 x 2 steel tube. Assembled as per the picture and all you have to do is wind the one nut down the thread!



Or you could buy one of these

http://www.oppositelock.com.au/catalogu ... repair-kit

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Landrover FC 101 (77)
Landrover Series 1 SWB Station Wagon (57)
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 7:48 am 
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Actually I did try using my little bottle jack and a piece of wood the correct length to go under the Haflinger bed and then tried jacking it up - all that happened was it jacked the Haflinger up in to the air! (Yes I had let all the air out of the tyre!)

Gary,

That looks a good kit for mending punctures, but I haven't worked out if the metal item at the bottom can actually be used to "break" the bead or if it is just used to spread the tyre open so you can clean and put a patch on the inside.

I have seen a long handled "C" shaped thing which is designed to do the job, but I missed the last one I saw on Fleabay and all the new ones cost too much for a maybe once a year task.

John

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 10:47 am 
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It is a complete system to break the bead and take the tyre off the rim and do whatever repairs are needed to do. It is designed to assist outback trekkers when offroad to change tyres when they get punctured - many people also carry tyre carcasses when outback travelling as punctures can be numerous and a number of spare wheels with tyres on them heavy.

These will change up to 35" tyres so little 22" haflinger tyres would be a breeze.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 7:23 pm 
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A bit of google and Utube helped me understand how the bead braker in Gary's link works. Just the bead braker from that kit is expensive on Fleabay, so I think I will stick with my home made system for the moment.

During my trawl of the Internet to find out how that version of bead braker worked, I obviously came across a fair number of other variations - maybe I have a go at copying one at some point.

John

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2014 1:25 am 
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If you shop around you should be able to find the tyres pliers and special levers for about 70 or 80 in your money - the more expensive stuff like I linked has all the goodies.

Then I guess you would not need them in the UK as you are no more than about 5 miles from a garage anywhere in the country ;). So I am not sure if they are available over there.

I changed three wheel barrow tyres and tubes last week no issues just using a screw driver and two levers - so even a little fella should be able to remove haffie tyres.

However having said that, a friend offered to remove my Semperits off my 12" rims a little while ago and he had some issues getting the bead to break and get the tyre off and that was on a proper tyre removing machine. The tyres seemed to really want to stick to the rims.

Garry

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Range Rover Sport TDV6 (07)
Landrover FC 101 (77)
Landrover Series 1 SWB Station Wagon (57)
Landrover Series 1 SWB (57)
Jaguar E-type Roadster V12 (71)


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2014 8:38 am 
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A lot depends on how long the tyre has been on the rim. The longer it has been on the rim the more likely it is to have vulcanised itself to the rim, making it harder to take off. Some tyres I have been able to jump up and down on and the bead has broken with out any trouble.

I just found that it was less effort to make a suitable tool than to struggle.... :P :geek:

John

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 2:57 am 
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heinkeljb wrote:
A lot depends on how long the tyre has been on the rim. The longer it has been on the rim the more likely it is to have vulcanised itself to the rim, making it harder to take off. Some tyres I have been able to jump up and down on and the bead has broken with out any trouble.

I just found that it was less effort to make a suitable tool than to struggle.... :P :geek:

John


Way to go John!

I have a military tire service kit, Swiss I think, that has a set of large spoons of various shapes, and a small set. The small spoons should be fine for Haflinger tires. I have been mounting all my tires myself, even the 14.5 x 20's for the Unimogs, and don't mind the job at all. Lube is the key, and a Highlift jack for breaking beads. I am beginning to notice the increased difficulty of raising one of these big ones from flat on the ground though!!

Bob

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